Comics

Issue by Issue – Dragonring #2

Writer – Guang Yap, Gordon Derry
Artist – Guang Yap, Barry Blair
Inker – Michael Pender
Letters – Elwin Mark

Kohl Drake searches for answers as to just what his new dragon ring is from a guy that looks like Peter Cushing while a monster roams the streets of Hong Kong, one from which Yué narrowly escapes. The story ends on a cliff-hanger which finds Miles’ ship about to sink, though it remains to be seen as to where Drake is. The first tale written and drawn by Guang Yap with an assist by Barry Blair is much like the first book in the series, a little disjointed though improved in this issue with the artwork saving it from being a disappointment. There is some good horror present, the monster being quite menacing and while Yué injures the creature, there is a better than average chance that it still lives and just may come to menace Yué or Drake in future issues. Additionally there is a bit of drama involving Kohl and the woman who loves him, a scene that seems out of place amongst everything else and really served no purpose other than filling a page in the book. Aside from the main story, there is a second that goes back in time that features Miles in a tale of terror and the cursed Eye of Assurmya-Rahiin. Unlike the first half of the book, the artwork is poorer despite Yap being the artist on both though it does work in a sense, being grimmer and grittier and perhaps even more suited to the content it portrays. The problem with it all, that being the entire book, is that with the writing being so hit and miss, it is hard to make a connection with any of the characters except perhaps with Yué who seems to feature in the book more often than its star. That too is a mistake that Yap makes, for when he introduced Drake and the mystery of his ring and his destiny in the first issue that should have been the entire focus of the first book, not to mention the second. Altogether, there is still just enough to keep readers somewhat interested in what might happen going forward, but the book needs focus and hopefully, Yap reins it in and does just that.

2.5 out of 5

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