Comics

Mind Capsules – Grayson #8 and Star Trek/Planet of the Apes: The Primate Directive #3

Grayson #8
Grayson #8

Writer – Tim Seeley, Tom King
Artist – Mikel Janin
Colours – Jeremy Cox

The machinations of Mr. Minos have come home to roost and Helena is among their first casualties.  Soon the school is on alert and Dick is hunting the man down and you know that it is not strictly for professional reasons.  Meanwhile, Tim Seeley and Tom King flash the book back and forth between the hunt for Minos and to the undefined time period where Minos is having a discussion with a person whom we eventually learn to be his boss.  It is an extremely effective way to tell the story as it not only chronicles a physical battle with the man, but also one of wits and in both struggles, Minos comes out on the losing end.  The action is fast and the pace never lets up as we see Dick, Helena and their students take on Minos and his newly assembled robot.  Said robot is named Paragon and also contains all of the organs that Dick and company have retrieved for Spyral to which, they also give Paragon all of the powers of the JLA.  So not only does Dick have to face Mr. Minos, but he has to get past a killer robot just to make things a little bit worse.  There are a couple of problems with the issue with one of them being the abruptness of Minos instituting his plan.  Why is it that after the slow build-up over the past seven issues of the series is there a hurry for the story to suddenly end?  It seemed rushed and extremely out of place.  It was not terrible, not by any means, just strange to see.  The second point of contention was the lack of explanation over the clones of Minos introduced last issue.  Are they clones, robots or something else?  Without an explanation, when Minos is taken care of in this issue, twice, were they clones or was one of them the real him?  Also, could he come back in a future issue because he is still alive?  It is just a little bit confusing, but again, does not really take away from the excitement of the issue.  So while there is a lot to love, including the returning pencils of Mikel Janin, there are still many unanswered questions.

4 out of 5

Star Trek Planet of the Apes The Primate Directive #3
Star Trek/Planet of the Apes: The Primate Directive #3

Writer – Scott Tipton, David Tipton
Artist – Rachael Stott
Colours – Charlie Kirchoff

Colonel Taylor is not a happy man.  He has never really gotten over the mistreatment he suffered at the hands of the apes and he is none too pleased with Captain Kirk either.  He cannot understand why the Captain will not use the weapons he has on the apes or what this directive of non-interference is all about, so if Captain Kirk will not do anything about the apes, then he will – no matter what it takes.  The crossover between these two classic science-fiction properties continues and while it might not seem a natural fit on the surface, it actually works quite perfectly.  All of the characters are fully realized by Scott and David Tipton and penciller Rachael Stott draws them wonderfully, if a little on the cartoonish side.  There are still some questions that arise when reading the tale like what exactly do the Klingons want, other than the obvious, power and territory?  So far they have done things quite overtly, stirring unrest and supplying the apes with weapons.  With Kirk and the Enterprise in orbit though, they will soon have to make a move if they are to see whatever plan they have succeed.  Conversely, the clock is counting down for the crew of the Enterprise, for if they do not find the Klingons and soon, things could go badly for them and the local populace.  The only thing missing from the book at the moment is the lack of a real involvement from the apes and their brethren.  Yes, they have been in the book and have been present, but so far have taken a backseat to the Starfleet crew.  The way things have been going, that looks to change soon and should be very exciting.

4 out of 5

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